Action Learning is a process that involves a small group working on real problems, taking action, and learning as individuals, as a team, and as an organization. It helps organizations develop creative, flexible and successful strategies to pressing problems.

Action Learning has emerged as a method of choice for global companies, government agencies, and non-profit groups that want to improve quality, cut costs, create new products and services, and change the cultures of their organizations. From Boston to Brazil, from Finland to Tokyo, companies as diverse as Microsoft, Samsung, Dow, GE, Deutsche Bank, Boeing, Sodexho, Novartis, Nokia and many others use Action Learning to solve complex problems, develop leaders, build teams and expand corporate capability.

Since Reg Revans first introduced it to coal miners of Wales and England in the 1940s, Action Learning has become a dynamic process that assists organizations to challenge the status quo, and to develop creative, flexible and successful strategies. Action Learning positions inquiry at the core of organizational behavior, develops critical thinking and creates mutual respect among employees at all levels. The focus on inquiry speaks to Peter Senge's concern that organizations should move from institutional training to a learning environment.

Action Learning solves dilemmas of all sizes, and is particularly effective with complex problems that may appear unsolvable. It elevates the norms, the collaboration, the creativity and the courage of groups that solve problems of great urgency to the organization.

Action Learning solves problems and develops leaders simultaneously because its simple rules force participants to think critically and work collaboratively, and because the group's coach, the Action Learning coach, assists group members to reflect, not on their problem solving, but on the elevation of their group functioning and on examples of their leadership skills. Action Learning participants become effective leaders as they solve difficult problems.